Category Archives: Judicial Ethics

Seventh Circuit’s Response to Judge Posner Misses the Point

The Seven Circuit, through Judge Wood, has responded to Judge Posner’s criticism of the Court’s approach to those without lawyers as follows: First, while [Judge Posner] is certainly entitled to his own views about such matters as our Staff Attorney’s … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice Generally, Appellate Practice, Defender Programs, Federal Courts, Judicial Ethics, Non-Lawyer Practice | 1 Comment

Speculative Thoughts on Changing Lawyers in Mid-Case — Manafort Edition

I want to draw your attention to the some specific language in the Politico story on Paul Manafort’s change of lawyers, quoting a Manafort spokesman (see especially my bold language): A spokesman confirmed the change. “Mr. Manafort is in the … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Counsel, Access to Justice Generally, Attorney-Client, Criminal Law, Dept. of Justice, Judicial Ethics, Legal Ethics

Algorithm Bias and Algorithm-Based Bias Compensation

As part of my series on algorithm bias, I want to offer what I think is a potentially revolutionary take on using algorithms not just to minimize, but actually to compensate for, bias and discrimination. The core idea is that … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice Generally, Bias, Discrimination, Judicial Ethics, Metrics, Race | 1 Comment

A Tool For Assessing SRL Hearing Quality from the US Dept. of Labor

As state start to think about evaluating how their judges do in cases without lawyers, this might be a useful starting point.  It is US Department of Labor Handbook on measuring hearing quality in unemployment hearings (in which the vast … Continue reading

Posted in Administative Proecdure, Judicial Ethics, Metrics, Research and Evalation | 1 Comment

On the Need for Uncompromising Reassertions of Neutral Principles Regardless of Inevitable Political Implications

There is obviously a lot to cheer about today, as different aspects of our complex, flexible, and therefore very resilient system starts to trigger its anti-fascism-antibodies. One of the most important, in the long term, may be the fact that … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice Generally, Constitution, International Cooperation, Judicial Ethics, Science

Principles for Legitimacy In Questioned Elections

Given the extreme importance for access to justice that even highly inflammatory issues are decided on a neutral and principled basis, I cross post my recent blog that discusses Legitimacy.  The Principles are intended to be non-partisan and universal. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice Generally, Congress, Constitution, Judicial Ethics | 1 Comment

True Neutrality in a Time of Existential Crisis

What is rapidly becoming not a national existential crisis, but a world existential crisis forces us to examine not the limits of neutrality, but the obligations of neutrality. The United States is enriched by enormous numbers of organizations that are … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice Generally, Constitution, Federal Courts, Judicial Ethics | 2 Comments